Grounds for Divorce in South Africa

GROUNDS FOR DIVORCE IN SOUTH AFRICA

Dissolution of marriage and grounds of divorce

A marriage may be dissolved by a court by a decree of divorce and the only grounds on which such a decree may be granted are the irretrievable break-down of the marriage as contemplated in section 4; the mental illness or the continuous unconsciousness, as contemplated in section 5, of a party to the marriage.

Irretrievable break-down of marriage as ground of divorce

A court may grant a decree of divorce on the ground of the irretrievable break-down of a marriage if it is satisfied that the marriage relationship between the parties to the marriage has reached such a state of disintegration that there is no reasonable prospect of the restoration of a normal marriage relationship between them.

Section 4 (2) of the Divorce Act lays down three circumstances which a Court may accept as evidence of irretrievable breakdown of a marriage and these are that:- the parties have not lived together as husband and wife for a continuous period of at least one year immediately prior to the date of the institution of the divorce action. The Defendant has committed adultery and that the Plaintiff finds it irreconcilable with a continued marriage relationship the Defendant has in terms of a sentence of a Court been declared a habitual criminal and is undergoing imprisonment as a result of such sentence.

This does not mean however that:- the man and wife have to live in separate buildings but the Courts are in general not willing to (even on a undisputed basis), hear the case if the parties are still living in the same house on the date of the application. There must be a reasonable explanation, but even then some judges have refused to grant a decree of divorce. if the Plaintiff is a party to an adulterous relationship it is not fatal for a final divorce order and it may be proof of a real break-down of the marriage. It is correct to disclose the adulterous relationship to the Court. if irretrievable breakdown has been proved, that the court still has discretion to refuse the divorce. See Levy v Levy 1991 (1) SA 614 A where the Appeal Court had decided that a court had no discretion to deny a divorce where the irretrievable breakdown of the marriage has been proved.

Court’s discretion

In terms of section 4(3) of the Divorce Act the Court still has discretion not to grant a divorce order but postpone the proceedings sine die or even dismiss the claim if it appears to the Court that there is a reasonable possibility that the parties may become reconciled through marriage counselling, treatment or reflection. The Summons also usually contains the averment that further marriage counselling and/or treatment will not lead to any reconciliation. This evidence must also be tendered to the Court even on an unopposed basis.

The Court must therefore be satisfied that the marriage has really irretrievably broken down and that there is no possibility of the continuation of a normal marriage, before a final divorce order will be granted.

The court may postpone the proceedings in order that the parties may attempt reconciliation if it appears to the court that there is a reasonable possibility that the parties may become reconciled through marriage counselling, treatment or reflection.

Where the parties live together again after the issue of Summons, it does not necessarily end the underlying cause of the action. If the reconciliation after a few months is seemingly unsuccessful, they can proceed on the same Summons. It is now confirmed that the marriage has really broken-down irretrievably even after the parties have tried a final time to become reconciled. Where a divorce action which is not defended is postponed in order to afford the parties an opportunity to attempt reconciliation, the court may direct that the action be tried de novo, on the date of resumption thereof, by any other magistrate/ judge of the court concerned in terms of section 4(4) of the Divorce Act. The notice of set down should be served on the defendant.

A customary marriage may be dissolved only on account of an irretrievable breakdown in the marriage and only if the High, Family or Divorce Court is satisfied that the marriage relationship between the parties has reached such a state of disintegration that there is no reasonable prospect of the restoration of a normal marriage relationship between them.

Mental illness or continuous unconsciousness as grounds of divorce:

A court may grant a decree of divorce on the ground of the mental illness of the defendant if it is satisfied that the defendant, in terms of the Mental

Health Act 18 of 1973; has been admitted as a patient to an institution in terms of a reception order; is being detained as a State patient at an institution or other place specified by the Minister of Correctional Services; or is being detained as a mentally ill convicted prisoner at an institution.

A divorce order may also be granted if such defendant has also for a continuous period of at least two years immediately prior to the institution of the divorce action, not been discharged unconditionally as such a patient,

State patient or mentally ill prisoner; and the court has heard evidence of at least two psychiatrists, of whom one shall have been appointed by the court, that the defendant is mentally ill and that there is no reasonable prospect that he will be cured of his mental illness.

A court may grant a decree of divorce on the ground that the defendant is by reason of a physical disorder in a state of continuous unconsciousness, if it is satisfied that the defendant’s unconsciousness has lasted for a continuous period of at least six months immediately prior to the institution of the divorce action; and after having heard the evidence of at least two medical practitioners, of whom one shall be a neurologist or a neurosurgeon appointed by the court, that there is no reasonable prospect that the defendant will regain consciousness.

The court may appoint a legal practitioner to represent the defendant at proceedings under this section and order the plaintiff to pay the costs of such representation.

The court may make any order it may deem fit with regard to the furnishing of security by the plaintiff in respect of any patrimonial benefits to which the defendant may be entitled by reason of the dissolution of the marriage.

For the purposes of this section the expressions ‘institution’, ‘mental illness’, ‘patient’, ‘State patient’ and ‘reception order’ shall bear the meaning assigned to them in the Mental Health Act, 1973.

The circumstances under which a court may grant a divorce order on the basis of mental illness or continuous unconsciousness is as follows:-

  •  In the case of mental illness the Defendant must have been admitted, in terms of the Mental Health Act, 1973 (Act No 18 of 1973), as a patient to an institution in terms of a reception order, for a period of at least two years and in any case two psychiatrists (one appointed by the Court) must satisfy the Court that there is no reasonable prospect that he will be cured of his mental illness.
  • In the case of unconsciousness the Court will only grant the order if the Defendant was unconscious for a continuous period of at least six months immediately prior to the institution of the action and also after hearing the evidence of two medical practitioners of whom one shall be a neurologist or a neuro-surgeon appointed by the Court who must declare that there is no reasonable prospect that the Defendant will regain consciousness.

In such cases a curator ad litem must be appointed to protect the interests of the Defendant (patient) and to assist the Court.

Bertus Preller is a Divorce and Family Law Attorney in Cape Town and has more than 20 years experience in most sectors of the law and 13 years as a practicing attorney. He specializes in Family law and Divorce Law at Abrahams and Gross Attorneys Inc. in Cape Town. Bertus is also the Family Law expert on Health24.com and on the expert panel of Law24.com and is frequently quoted on Family Law issues in newspapers such as the Sunday Times and Business Times. His areas of expertise are Divorce Law, Family Law, Divorce Mediation, Parenting Plans, Parental Responsibilities and Rights, Custody (care and contact) of children, same sex marriages, unmarried fathers rights, domestic violence matters, international divorce law, digital rights, media law and criminal law.

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Adultery and the emergence of the Alpha Woman…

Adultery and the emergence of the Alpha Woman

New research reveals that it’s not just powerful men who become sexual predators, but women too…

Sipping her glass of chilled Chablis, Erica Waddington’s eyes wandered slowly around the bar. It didn’t take her long to find what she was looking for. In the opposite corner, blond hair falling foppishly onto the collar of his Paul Smith shirt as he idly scrolled through his BlackBerry, was a stranger. And he was alone, like her.

As Erica’s eyes locked with his just an instant too long, she felt a surge of excitement. Crossing her legs suggestively, she knew all she had to do was wait. Sure enough, two minutes later, the stranger was standing casually at the bar beside her. For Erica, the thrill of the chase had begun.

‘Two hours later we were making passionate love in my hotel bedroom,’ Erica, 50, recalls with a smile. ‘After a long day at work, the release was exactly what I needed — my little treat to myself.’

Whether her husband and three children would agree with her is doubtful. But then, Erica’s not alone. In fact, she’s just one among a growing band of women who’ve been dubbed the Alpha Adulteresses.

These high-earning, successful women are every bit as willing as men to use their power to attract younger lovers for quick flings.

Newspapers are crammed with sex scandals involving powerful men. This past week alone, Dominique Strauss-Kahn — of late the world’s most powerful banker — has been accused of rape, megastar Arnold Schwarzenegger has admitted having a love-child with his housekeeper and the scandal surrounding MP Chris Huhne’s past indiscretions continues to rumble on.

However, a new academic study suggests women are inherently no more virtuous than men. It’s just that, in the past, they have lacked the confidence or opportunity to stray.

Like men, women are finding that power is a potent aphrodisiac. And just like men, they are giving in to the thrill of illicit lunchtime assignations and the sheer excitement that accompanies their transgression.

Nor do they feel any more guilty or ashamed about it than a man would — if anything, less so.

Professor Joris Lammers, of Tilburg University in the Netherlands, who conducted an anonymous survey of more than 1,500 readers of a business magazine, has found being powerful makes women more prone to be unfaithful.

He questioned people, from top executives to ordinary employees, about whether they’d had affairs. They were asked how powerful they thought they were and quizzed on other factors including their feelings of confidence, and what they thought their risk of being caught was.
The results revealed a strong link between power and infidelity, regardless of gender.
‘The strongest predictors are not religion or moral belief, but power and opportunity,’ says Professor Lammers. ‘Power can undermine your morality and increase your risk-taking, and the effect of power on women is just as strong as on men.’

Certainly, women like Erica are happy to admit they feel no shame in going all out to get what they want — not just in the boardroom but in the bedroom.

For Erica — for obvious reasons names in this article have been changed — treating herself to a night of illicit sex is on a moral par with her regular shopping trips to Paris, her facials and her gym membership. For her, and many other alpha females, sex is simply another trapping of success, a reward for hard work.

A millionaire businesswoman who runs her own chain of travel agencies, she lives in Cheshire with her husband, Thomas, 52, who works for her, and their three children aged from 11 to 17.

She says, ‘I love walking into a boardroom, wearing a beautiful tailored suit, knowing that every man’s eyes are on me. The success of my business — we had a turnover of £2million last year — gives me such a feeling of power and confidence, and that has translated into my attitude towards relationships.

‘I don’t feel guilty: my family have a lovely life, in a five-bedroom detached house with a swimming pool, thanks to my hard work, and my children are privately educated.

‘I suspect there are a lot more alpha women like me who but who simply aren’t prepared to admit they are using their power and money to have affairs.

‘I have had the best sex of my life in the past decade. None of these affairs, or flings, have meant anything to me, they are simply exciting and flattering.

‘My “shenanigans”, as I call them, are my way of de-stressing after my long working day. Inevitably they take place in hotels when I am away from home, and I have discovered that I can completely divorce my emotions from my sex life. I can be on the phone to my daughter talking about her homework one minute, and then gazing into the eyes of a handsome young man in a dimly-lit bar half an hour later.

‘I know men approach me because I am rich and successful, and I often end up paying the bar bill and for the meal. But that doesn’t bother me. In fact, it gives me a sense of achievement that I am totally in control of the situation.’

Lucy Kellaway, a columnist on the Financial Times, wrote her novel In Office Hours after observing the increasingly similar traits of male and female executives. Her main character, Stella, is a highly successful economist in her mid-40s who has an affair with her twentysomething trainee.

Kellaway says her character is typical of a new breed. ‘Climbing the career ladder can do weird things to people and it can corrupt both men and women,’ she says. ‘I think it’s very plausible that it makes women more sexually promiscuous.’

This is borne out by the volume of traffic on Illicit Encounters. The internet site which caters for married professionals looking for adulterous affairs has nearly 600,000 members, and women looking for extra-marital sex outnumber men by 3½ to 1. Most are married with children, aged between their early 30s and mid-40s, and pursuing a well-paid career.

‘Alpha women look for a partner and conduct their encounters in a very business-like fashion. They will often grill prospective partners as though they were conducting a job interview,’ says the website’s Rosie Freeman-Jones.

‘I was naïve when I joined this business. I thought women would be looking for a Brief Encounter-style romantic love affair. But it really is all about sex.’

Wealthy businesswoman Sarah Pattinson holds her hands up to that. She’s embroiled in an affair with a man eight years her junior. He give her the high-octane, high-risk sex she craves; she gives him expensive gifts and treats him to lovely holidays.

‘We met through friends and I fancied him instantly,’ admits Sarah, 49. ‘I think he was very impressed by my status and success.

‘He likes all my “toys” — the Range Rover Sport and my disposable income. I love to buy him clothes, and I recently paid for him to fly to India with a friend. In a way, he is my kept man. I have a phone that I use only to communicate with him which I keep hidden from my husband.

‘At work, I am the boss. I make tough decisions, I hire and fire, and I have to maintain this air of control. I get a buzz from the power and the adrenaline, and that has translated into my sex life.’

Sarah, a mother of two teenagers, runs her own head-hunting business in London and lives in Islington with her husband Robert, 52.

Like most Alpha Males, she regards her affair as a healthy distraction. And, like most Alpha Males, her success has given her an intoxicating sense of invincibility; she simply can’t imagine being caught out.

‘Before I ran this company, I don’t think I would have contemplated being unfaithful. But you do start to think no one can touch you and you are invincible,’ she admits.
‘On the surface, Robert and I have the perfect marriage — he works in the City in insurance, we have a beautiful five-bedroom home in Islington, our children are at a high-achieving private day school and our social life revolves around like-minded wealthy couples.

‘But sex is unfulfilling. If we didn’t have the children, I might have considered leaving Robert for my lover, but our lives are just too complicated to  un-pick. Besides, we do get on reasonably well and we have a fabulous lifestyle, including a villa with a swimming pool in Portugal.

‘We have a live-in nanny who also acts as our housekeeper so my domestic duties are quite light. I work thirteen or fourteen hour days, and I have evening meetings too. This gives me the freedom to meet my lover, who also works in the City.

‘Sometimes I take risks. Once my lover Nick rang me at home and Robert could have picked up. I’ll make excuses to walk down the garden and phone Nick at the weekends, and often I ring his phone just to hear his voice.

‘The sex is incredible, and I think the “edge” of ours being an illicit affair makes it even more enticing.

‘Nick makes me feel beautiful and alive, and he keeps me young. I need to feel vibrant to stay on top of the game, especially during this recession, and that adulterous sex gives me that kick, that energy, to keep me motivated at work. Sex with Nick is my reward for my success and exhausting hard work. I would die, though, if Robert or the children ever found out.’

So why do women, who have worked so hard to achieve professional success, risk losing everything for the sake of adulterous sex, however electric?

According to Rosie Freeman-Jones, risk is a key element. ‘Both men and women at the top are addicted to risk. It is part of the DNA of successful people that they are more prone to take risks and more prone to cheat,’ she says.

But you have only to look at golfer Tiger Woods to see how quickly an affair can destroy not just a marriage but a career and reputation.

Even if he is found not guilty of rape, will former International Monetary fund head Dominique Strauss-Kahn ever be able to rebuild his reputation? Meanwhile, Schwarzenegger has shelved plans for a career comeback in order to deal with the fallout from his affair.

And Lucy Kellaway warns that Alpha Adultresses are risking even more than their male counterparts.

‘There is a double standard,’ she says. ‘A man having an affair might be seen as a bit of a lad, whereas a woman like Stella in my book is likely to be seen as pathetic, or a bitch and a slapper.

‘Because there are so few women executives, the ones that do succeed are put on a pedestal — and they have a lot farther to fall. The message of my book is that affairs end badly for everyone.’

And, while the figures demonstrate very clearly that increasing numbers of successful women are being tempted to stray, can women really divorce sex from commitment in the same way as a man?
Article Source:  http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-1389812/Adultery-Alpha-Woman-Its-just-powerful-men-sexual-predators.html#ixzz1NMzBRiE9

Compiled by: www.divorceattorney.co.za

Online Divorce in South Africa

In today’s society, with the constraints and pressures of everyday life why should obtaining a divorce have to make everything grind to a halt? The answer is simply it shouldn’t and doesn’t have to. Hundreds of people every month throughout South Africa are seeking ways to reduce the amount of time it takes and the costs involved in obtaining a divorce and turn to online divorce services such as eDivorce to assist them in this process.

By using an online divorce service the average divorce can be completed in just 4 weeks and cost (excluding sheriff fees) from as little as R 950.00 in comparison to Attorney fees that can be in excess of R 10 000.00.

To start the divorce process is easy, if you are involved in an uncontested divorce. Simply go to http://www.edivorce.co.za and register. Then fill in a questionnaire that will take about 20 minutes and your divorce documents will be generated in less than 24 hours.

The system generates the following documents:

  • Combined Summons
  • Particulars of Claim
  • Consent Paper – Settlement Agreement
  • Parenting Plan
  • Annexure A for the Family Advocate
  • Government Statistics Form (Form 07 – 04)
  • Step-by-Step letter, explaining the process

The eDivorce process has two Divorce Plans from which you can choose:

The Silver Plan – R 950 + Sheriff fee of between R 100 – R 150

  • All your divorce forms – completed for you by the eDivorce platform and checked by divorce experts.
  • Step-by-Step Guide -Written in plain English and easy to follow.
  • Fast Service – Documents delivered within 24 – 36 hours guaranteed.

The Gold Plan – Managed Divorce Service – R 5 000 all inclusive:

  • The price you pay is fixed from the start of your case and includes everything you will need.
  • All your required divorce documents-Prepared and completed by divorce specialists.
  • 7 day a week service- We are open when it is convenient for you. All documents filed at court for you – We deal with all the filing and admin.
  • Settlement Agreements are catered for- We can help you, with or without children.
  • Get a Free Will – For both Husband and Wife if you need one.
  • Divorce in 4 to 6 weeks -Fast service guaranteed.
  • Attorney supervised – All services supervised by an Attorney.
  • Appearance at Court – We appoint an Attorney or Advocate to appear with you on your behalf with you at Court.
  • Professional and Trustworthy.
  • Save over R 3000 – Fixed fee for all the work.

eDivorce is a technology platform enabling members of the public to draft their own legal documentation for purposes of initiating and concluding uncontested divorce proceedings through either the High Courts or Divorce Courts in South Africa.

In matters where there is disputes over the children, it will be better to see an attorney.

The Department of Justice and Constitutional Development has amended the Magistrate’s Courts Act of 1944 giving powers to Regional Courts to now deal with divorce cases as well. President Jacob Zuma announced the commencement of the Jurisdiction of Regional Courts Amendment Act which came into effect on 9th August 2010, the National Woman’s Day. The Regional Courts were established in 1952 to deal with divorces, serious criminal offences and mete out harsher penalties. The amendments increase access to justice to members of the public, in particular, women and children who go to courts daily for the resolution of family related disputes relating to divorce; maintenance; adoption; and matters relating to custody of minor children.

These amendments are good news for people utilising the eDivorce process, a DIY online divorce service at http://www.edivorce.co.za for the mere reason that it offers parties in a divorce action the opportunity to conclude their divorce in their area of residence, faster and with wider access to the courts. Previously divorces in South Africa were handled by just a few Family Courts and the High Court and through the implementation of the new system; it will be not only more cost effective but also quicker as a result of the spread in the workload.

  • There are now 62 more Regional courts to deal with same workload that the 3 former divorce courts.
  • This will assist in reducing case backlogs both at the High Courts and Magistrates Courts.
  • Proceedings in the High Courts are complex to the extent that attorneys and advocates are usually instructed resulting in high litigation costs.
  • Regional courts have a reduced scale of costs in relation to the High Court, and simplified proceedings which include the use of mediation in resolving civil disputes.
  • Registrars and assistant registrars appointed at each regional court to provide assistance to member of the public.

The Courts are located in the diagram below:

Province New seat of civilRegional Court Areas in respect of which the civil Regional Court has jurisdiction
EasternCape East London East London, Komgha and Mdantsane
Grahamstown Albany, Adelaide, Alexandria, Bathurst, Bedford and Somerset East.
Graaff-Reinet Graaff-Reinet, Aberdeen, Cradock, Hofmeyr, Jansenville, Middelburg, Pearston and Willowmore.
King William’sTown King William’s Town, Cathcart, Fort Beaufort, Keiskammahoek, Middledrift, Peddie, Stutterheim, Victoria East andZwelitsha.
Mthatha Umtata, Bizana, Butterworth (Gcuwa), Elliot, Elliotdale (Xhora), Engcobo, Flagstaff (Siphaqeni) , Idutywa, Kentani (Centane), Libode, Lusikisiki, Maclear, Matatiele, Mount Ayliff (Maxesibeni), Mount Fletcher, Mount Frere (Kwabacha) , Mqanduli, Nqamakwe, Ngqeleni, Port St Johns (Umzimvubu), Qumbu, Tabankulu, Tsolo, Tsomo and Willowvale (Gatyana)
Port Elizabeth Port Elizabeth, Kirkwood, Motherwell and Uitenhage.
Queenstown Queenstown, Albert, Aliwal North, Barkley East, Glen Grey (Cacadu) (Lady Frere), Herschel, Hewu, Indwe, Lady Grey, Mo;teno, Mpofu (Seymor) (Stockentrom), Ntabethemba, Sterkstroom, Steynsburg, St Marks (Cofimvaba), Tarka, Venterstad, Wodehouse and Xalanga (Cala).
Humansdorp Humansdorp, Hankey, Joubertina, and Steytlerville.
Free State Bethlehem Bethlehem, Ficksburg, Fouriesburg, Frankfort, Harrismith, Lindley, Reitz, Senekal, Villiers, Vrede and Witsieshoek.
Bloemfontein Bloemfontein , Bethulie, Boshof, Botshabelo, Brandfort, Clocolan, Dewetsdorp, Edenburg, Excelsior , Fauresmith, Jacobsdal, Jagersfontein, Koffirfontein, Ladybrand, Marquard, Petrusburg, Philippolis, Reddersburg, Rouxville, Smithfield, Trompsburg, Thaba Nchu, Wepener and Zastron
Kroonstad Kroonstad, Heilbron, Koppies, Parys, Sasolburg, Viljoenskroon and Vredefort.
Welkom Welkom, Bothaville, Bultfontein, Hennenman, Hoopstad, Odendaalsrus, Theunissen, Ventersburg, Virginia, Wesselsbron and Winburg.
Gauteng Ekangala Ekangala, Bronkhorstspruit and Cullinan.
Johannesburg Johannesburg. [Can also go to Kliptown Regional Court]
Kempton Park Kempton Park, Benoni, Boksburg, Daveyton and Tembisa.
Kliptown (Canalso go to JohannesburgRegionalCourt) Armadale, Chiawelo, Comptonville, Devland, Dhlamini, Diepkloof, Dobsonville, Dobsonville Gardens, Doornkop, Dube, Emdeni, Jabavu, Jabavu Central Western, Jabulani, Klipriviersoog, Klipspruit, Klipspruit West, Lenaron, A.H., Lougherin A.H., Lufhereng, Mapetla, Meadowlands, Meredale, Mofolo Central, Mofolo North, Mofolo South, Molapo, Moletsane, Moroka, Moroka North, Naledi, Naturena, Nomzamo, Noordgesig, Orlando, Orlando East, Orlando Ekhaya, Orlando West, Phiri, Pimville Ext & Zones, Power Park, Protea City, Protea Glen, Protea North, Protea North Ext.1, Protea North Ext.9, Protea South Ext.1, Racecourse, Riversdale, Senaoane, Stesa A.H, Slovoville, Slovoville Ext.1, Tladi, Zola, Zola Ext.1 and Zondi.
Oberholzer Oberholzer and Westonaria.
Pretoria Pretoria, Atteridgeville, Mamelodi, Soshanguve and Wonderboom.
Randburg Randburg and Alexandra.
Roodepoort Roodepoort, Krugersdorp and Randfontein.
Germiston Germiston and Alberton.
Vereeniging Vereeniging, Meyerton and Vanderbijlpark.
Springs Springs, Brakpan, Heidelberg and Nigel.
KwaZulu-Natal Durban Durban, Chatsworth, Inanda, Lower Tugela, Ndwedwe, Pinetown, Umbumbulu, Umlazi and Ntuzuma.
Empangeni Empangeni (Lower Umfolozi), Eshowe, Hlabisa, Kranskop, Mahlabatini, Mapumulo, Mtonjaneni,Mtunzini and Nkandhla.
Newcastle Newcastle, Dannhauser, Dundee, Estcourt, Glencoe, Klip River, Madadeni, Msinga, Utrecht and Weenen.
Vryheid Vryheid, Babanango, Ingwavuma, Ngotshe, Nongoma, Nqutu, Paulpietersburg, Piet Retief and Ubombo.
Pietermaritzburg Pietermaritzburg, Bergville, Camperdown, Impendle, Lion’s River, Mooi River, New Hanover, Polela, Richmond, Umvoti and Underberg.
Port Shepstone Port Shepstone, Alfred, Ixopo, Mount Currie, Umzimkulu and Umzinto.
Limpopo Giyani Giyani, Bolobedu, Malamulele, Sekgosese, Tshitale and Vuwani.
Lebowakgomo Thabamoopo.
Sekhukhune Sekhukhuneland, Nebo and Praktiseer
Modimolle Waterberg, Ellisras, Northam, Phalala, Thabazimbi and Warmbaths.
Polokwane Pietersburg, Bochum, Mankweng, Mokerong, Potgietersrus and Seshego.
Tzaneen Letaba, Lulekani, Namakgale, Naphuno, Ritavi and Phalaborwa.
Thohoyandou Thohoyandou, Dzanani, Hlanganani, Messina, Mutale, Sibasa, Soutpansberg, Tiyani and Tshilwavhisiku.
Mpumalanga Eerstehoek (Elukwatini) Eerstehoek, Carolina, Ermelo, Piet Retief and Wakkerstroom.
Evander Highveld Ridge, Amersfoort, Balfour, Bethal, Delmas, Standerton and Volksrust.
KwaMhlanga Kwamhlanga, Mathanjana, Mbibana, Mdutjana and Mkobola.
Middelburg Middelburg, Groblersdal, Kriel, Moutse and Witbank.
Mbombela Nelspruit, Barberton, Belfast, Lydenburg, Mapulaneng, Mhala, Nkomazi, Nsikazi, Pilgrim’s Rest, Waterval-Boven and White River.
Northern Cape De Aar De Aar, Britstown, Carnarvon, Colesberg, Hanover, Noupoort, Philipstown, Richmond and Victoria West.
Kimberley Kimberley, Barkly West, Hartswater, Douglas, Hopetown, Jan Kempdorp and Warrenton.
Springbok Calvinia, Fraserburg, Garies, Namaqualand, Port Nolloth, Sutherland and Williston.
Upington Gordonia, Groblershoop, Hay, Kakamas, Kathu, Keimoes, Kenhardt, Kuruman, Olifantshoek, Pofadder, Postmasburg and Prieska.
North West Brits Brits and Warmbaths.
Ga-Rankuwa Odi and Pretoria.
Klerksdorp Klerksdorp, Bloemhof, Christiana, Schweizer-Reneke and Wolmaransstad.
Mmabatho Molopo (Mafikeng), Atamelang, Ditsobotla, Mafeking, Lehurutshe, Lichtenburg, Mafeking, Ottosdal and Zeerust
Potchefstroom Potchefstroom, Coligny and Ventersdorp.
Rustenburg Rustenburg, Bafokeng, Koster, Madikwe, Mankwe, Marico and Swartruggens.
Temba Moretele
Vryburg Vryburg, Delareyville, Ganyesa, Kudumane (Tlhaping-Tlharo), Kuruman and Taung.
Western Cape Atlantis Atlantis, Clanwilliam, Hopefield, Malmesbury, Moorreesburg, Piketberg, Van Rhynsdorp, Vredenburg and Vredendal.
Bellville Bellville, Bluedowns and Kuils River.
Cape Town Cape and Goodwood.
George George, Heidelberg, Knysna, Mossel Bay, Riversdale, Thembaletu and Uniondale.
Mitchells Plain Mitchells Plain and Khayelitsha.
Oudtshoorn Oudtshoorn, Beaufort West, Calitzdorp, Ladismith, Murraysburg and Prince Albert.
Somerset West Somerset West, Bredasdorp, Caledon, Grabouw, Hermanus, Paarl, Stellenbosch, Strand,Tulbagh, Wellington and Wolseley.
Worcester Worcester, Bonnievale, Ceres, Laingsburg, Montagu, Robertson and Swellendam.
Wynberg Wynberg, Athlone, Phillipi and Simon’s Town.

For further info and how to conclude your divorce through the online eDivorce process at a fraction of the normal cost, visit http://www.edivorce.co.za or email info@edivorce.co.za, you can also call the eDivorce hotline on 0835334428

Shared Parenting

What is Shared Parenting?

“An arrangement whereby children freely enjoy the love and nurture of both parents and their wider family following separation or divorce …it does mean that sufficient time is spent with each parent for the child to view each parent as a parent rather than an aunty or uncle.”

(ASP definition of Shared Parenting as adopted by CAFCASS in 2004)

Shared parenting is an arrangement after divorce wherein both parents continue to have a strong positive presence in their children’s lives. Shared parenting entails that a child spend equal or significant amounts of time with each parent.

As a divorce and family law attorney I see a huge shift towards a more collaborative approach between parents to share equal time with their children after divorce.

Shared parenting arrangements may differ to suit various situations. Time between each parent may be split 50/50 or the children may live with one parent for example, four days every week and the rest of the week with another parent.

After divorce, shared parenting is a preferred alternative to asking the children to choose where they want to live. Many children prefer shared parenting rather than the traditional arrangements. With shared parenting, the children still has the chance to have a meaningful relationship with both of their parents.

There are many benefits to shared parenting. It allows a child to have both his/her parents present in his/her life and although the child has to switch between two homes, shared parenting reassures the child that both parents care for them. This arrangement is more beneficial to a child than when they live with only one parent because often the latter creates a distance both physical and emotional between the child and the “absent” parent.

Studies show that children of divorced couples who retain meaningful relationships with each parent are the ones who find it easier to deal with the breakup of their parents. Research also shows shared parenting is possible despite intense conflict between parents if the parents focus on what is best for their children.

Almost half of the children in the U.S. are deprived of the lifelong benefits of two parents who share the parenting throughout the first 18 years of their children’s lives.

The Benefits of Shared Residence and Shared Parenting

  • Removes the need for a child to choose between the parents
  • Allows both parents to love and nurture the child in much the same way as they did prior to parental separation and therefore promotes the continuation of family life
  • The child does not feel rejected by the non-resident parent and does not blame himself
  • Confirms to the child that he still has two parents who love and wish to care for him
  • The child derives emotional and psychological security from having two fully engaged parents
  • The child is no longer brought up to believe that the resident parent is the real, better or main parent and that the non-resident parent is a lesser parent or to be rejected
  • Re-affirms the responsibility of each parent to care and provide for the child
  • Sends a clear message to the resident parent, schools, doctors and the courts that both parents are equal and that all decisions relating to the child should be based on this principle
  • The child is more likely to grow up in a well-adjusted manner
  • Reduces parental hostility as it requires both parents to negotiate and make joint decisions

Bertus Preller is a Divorce and Family Law Attorney in Cape Town and has more than 20 years experience in most sectors of the law and 13 years as a practicing attorney. He specializes in Family law and Divorce Law at Abrahams and Gross Attorneys Inc. in Cape Town. Bertus is also the Family Law expert on Health24.com and on the expert panel of Law24.com and is frequently quoted on Family Law issues in newspapers such as the Sunday Times and Business Times. His areas of expertise are Divorce Law, Family Law, Divorce Mediation, Parenting Plans, Parental Responsibilities and Rights, Custody (care and contact) of children, same sex marriages, unmarried fathers rights, domestic violence matters, international divorce law, digital rights, media law and criminal law.

Bertus Preller

B.Proc; AD Dip L Law

Family Law Attorney

A:1st Floor, 56 Shortmarket Street, Cape Town, 8000

O: +27 (0) 21 422 1323

F: 086 572 8373

C: +27 (0) 83 443 9838

E: bertus@divorceattorney.co.za; W:  www.divorceattorney.co.za; Twitter: www.twitter.com/edivorce;

Facebook: www.facebook.com/divorceattorneys; Skype: divorceattorney

Domestic Violence – the role of the Police

The role of the police in fighting acts of domestic violence

Domestic violence and abuse can occur among heterosexual couples, same-sex couples, as well as any people living together in the same household. It is important to note that while women and children are the most victimized, men are also abused, especially verbally and emotionally, although sometimes physically too. Domestic violence occurs in all age ranges, ethnic groups, and class levels.

In the past, the police have been criticized for not responding adequately to cases of domestic violence. In an attempt to rectify this, the legislature enacted the Domestic Violence Act 116 of 1998 (the Act). Legislators placed particular obligations on the police in the Act in an effort to challenge their long history of neglect of domestic violence cases (Lisa Vetten ‘Addressing domestic violence in South Africa: Reflections on strategy and practice’ www.un.org/womenwatch/daw/egm/vaw-gp-2005/docs/experts/vetten.vaw.pdf). This article takes a look at the role that police officials should play in domestic violence cases.

The Domestic Violence Act

The aim of the Act, as stated in its preamble, is

‘to afford the victims of domestic violence the maximum protection from domestic abuse that the law can provide; and to introduce measures which seek to ensure that the relevant organs of state give full effect to the provisions of this Act’.

This legislative intervention was seen as progressive and necessary to protect mostly the rights of women and children. However, the Act has not brought about the expected results as acts of domestic violence continue to occur. Domestic violence is defined in the Act as

‘physical abuse, sexual abuse, emotional, verbal and psychological abuse, economic abuse, intimidation, harassment, stalking, damage to property, entry into the complainant’s residence without consent where the parties do not share the same residence, or any other controlling or abusive behaviour towards a complainant, where such conduct harms, or may cause imminent harm to, the safety, health or well-being of the complainant’.

Domestic violence is defined broadly in the Act in order to capture the most common abusive behaviours that victims are exposed to on an almost daily basis in South Africa. Domestic violence cases are regarded as civil cases, hence domestic violence is not defined as a crime in the Act. This means that there is no specific crime of domestic violence in South Africa. Such a criminal case will be conducted separately from the civil proceedings in the domestic violence case.

The role of the police

To ensure that cases of domestic violence are taken seriously, the Act places an obligation on members of the South African Police Service (SAPS) to monitor, enforce and oversee the implementation of the requirements of the Act. In terms of s 2 of the Act, any member of the SAPS at the scene of an incident of domestic violence or as soon thereafter as is reasonably possible, or when the incident of domestic violence is reported, must –

  • assist or make arrangements for the complainant to find a suitable shelter and obtain medical treatment;
  • hand a notice containing information as prescribed to the complainant in his official language; and
  • if it is reasonably possible, to explain the contents of such notice as well as the remedies that are at the disposal of the complainant, and the right to lodge a criminal complaint if applicable.

Section 2 requires police officers to make an immediate assessment of the need for first aid or other medical assistance. This implies that there must be cooperation between the police and the Department of Health to make ambulances available. This section does not, however, give clear directives on how the police should go about ensuring that the victim does obtain medical attention. It might also be desirable for the police official to accompany the victim to get medical attention in order to ensure that the continuity and integrity of the evidence is maintained.

Furthermore, the police have a duty to explain the investigation processes and procedures to the complainant and make it clear to the complainant that domestic violence cases are taken seriously. They should also emphasise the importance of the complainant being truthful and forthcoming with relevant information that may assist the police in protecting his rights. The police officials are also obliged in terms of s 2(c) to explain to the complainant –

  • the possible remedies that are open to the complainant;
  • that the complainant has the right to apply for a protection order in terms of s 4 of the Act; and
  • the right to lay criminal charges if the domestic violence act concerned constitutes a crime.

If it is reasonably possible, the police official handling a domestic violence case must assist the complainant in his language in terms of s 2(b) and (c) of the Act. It would be difficult, if not impossible, for the police to carry out the requirements of s 2 if they are not adequately trained to deal with domestic violence cases. It is doubtful whether members of SAPS are sufficiently trained to carry out their duties as required by the Act.

It is important that police officials entrusted with dealing with domestic violence cases receive special training to enable them to carry out their obligations as required by the Act. The police should also be adequately trained to conduct domestic violence cases efficiently. It has been recommended that when an incident of domestic violence is reported to SAPS, the statement-taking should include five essential questions on –

  • the history of the abuse;
  • a description of the most recent incidence of domestic violence;
  • any medical attention sought by the complainant as a result of the current incident or previous incidents or any other evidence to show that an act of domestic violence has taken place;
  • the complainant’s knowledge of any previous criminal records of the accused; and
  • the complainant’s knowledge of any orders against the accused, including protection orders, interdicts and maintenance orders (see Lillian Artz ‘Better safe than sorry: Magistrates’ views on the Domestic Violence Act’ Crime Quarterly No 7 2004).

Furthermore, s 3 of the Act empowers police officials to arrest at the scene of domestic violence without a warrant if there is a reasonable suspicion that an offence committed has elements of violence.

Failure to comply with [the requirements of s 2] constitutes misconduct and the National Commissioner of the SAPS is required to submit six-monthly reports to parliament detailing the number and nature of complaints against the police for failing to adhere to these statutory obligations; disciplinary proceedings instituted and steps taken as a result of recommendations made by the Independent Complaints Directorate’ (Vetten).

State’s obligation to protect against domestic violence

In terms of s 12(1)(c) of the Constitution, everyone has the right to freedom and security of the person, which includes the right to be free from all forms of violence from either public or private sources. The Constitutional Court in S v Baloyi (Minister of Justice and Another Intervening) 2000 (2) SA 425 (CC) para 11 has held that:

‘Read with s 7(2), s 12(1) has to be understood as obliging the state directly to protect the right of everyone to be free from private or domestic violence. Indeed, the state is under a series of constitutional mandates which include the obligation to deal with domestic violence: To protect both the rights of everyone to enjoy freedom and security of the person and to bodily and psychological integrity, and the right to have their dignity respected and protected, as well as the defensive rights of everyone not to be subjected to torture in any way and not to be treated or punished in a cruel, inhuman or degrading way’.

By promulgating the Act, the state was conscious of the fact that domestic and family violence is a pervasive and frequently lethal problem that challenges society at every level. The importance of eradicating domestic violence and abuse in our society cannot be overstated. In order to comply with its constitutional mandate, the state entrusted the police with the duty to protect victims of domestic violence.

‘[SAPS] is one of the primary agencies of the state responsible for the protection of the public in general, and women and children in particular, against the invasion of their fundamental rights by perpetrators of violent crime’ (Carmichele v Minister of Safety and Security and Another (Centre for Applied Legal Studies Intervening) 2001 (4) SA 938 (CC)).

Conclusion

Domestic violence remains a major social ill in South Africa and requires law enforcement agencies to work aggressively to prevent it. The Act is an expression of the state’s commitment to eliminate domestic violence. However, in order for the implementation of the Act to be successful, police officials must be trained to enable them to make informed decisions that best protect victims of domestic violence and abuse. In order for police officials to be able to adequately inform victims of their rights in terms of the Act and to explain certain information, they need detailed understanding of the issues involved and an ability to put information across in a clear and simple manner. Domestic violence cases involve particular investigative skills, which the state must ensure that members of the police are equipped with.

Article by Clement Marumoagae LLB (Wits) LLM (NWU) who is a candidate attorney at the Wits Law Clinic – De Rebus.

Compiled by Bertus Preller a Divorce and Family Law Attorney in Cape Town who has more than 20 years experience in most sectors of the law and 13 years as a practicing attorney. He specializes in Family law and Divorce Law at Abrahams and Gross Attorneys Inc. in Cape Town. Bertus is also the Family Law expert on Health24.com and on the expert panel of Law24.com and is frequently quoted on Family Law issues in newspapers such as the Sunday Times and Business Times. His areas of expertise are Divorce Law, Family Law, Divorce Mediation, Parenting Plans, Parental Responsibilities and Rights, Custody (care and contact) of children, same sex marriages, unmarried fathers rights, domestic violence matters, international divorce law, digital rights, media law and criminal law.

Bertus Preller

B.Proc; AD Dip L Law

Family Law Attorney

A:1st Floor, 56 Shortmarket Street, Cape Town, 8000

O: +27 (0) 21 422 1323

F: 086 572 8373

C: +27 (0) 83 443 9838

E: bertus@divorceattorney.co.za; W:  www.divorceattorney.co.za; Twitter: www.twitter.com/edivorce;

Facebook: www.facebook.com/divorceattorneys; Skype: divorceattorney

Divorce Checklist, what women should know

Divorce, what women need to know?

  1. You have to understand your marriage regime, and if you don’t, then find someone who can explain it properly to you. Are you married in or out of community of property? If you are married in community of property, you will by law be entitled to 50% of the communal estate and if you are married out of community of property with the accrual system, you are entitled to half of the difference of you and your spouse’s accruals. If you are married out of community of property without the accrual prior to 1 November 1984, you will be entitled to ask for a redistribution of assets, which can entail that you may be able to claim 50% of the joint assets, but if you married out of community of property without the accrual after 1 November 1984 you will only have a claim for maintenance under certain circumstances.
  2. You can under certain circumstances claim rehabilitative maintenance. Rehabilitative maintenance is where one spouse pays the other for a period of time, say for two years, so that the ex-spouse can study, for example, to get a job or search for employment. Rehabilitative maintenance can also be used in setting up house again, relocation costs, utility bills, etc.
  3. Remember that you can lodge an application pending divorce to obtain maintenance while the divorce is in the process, you can also claim in such an application that your spouse makes a contribution to your legal expenses.
  4. Obtain as much financial information on your spouse; make copies of all bank statements, credit card statements and the like as well as a schedule of all the assets and liabilities, sources of income etc.
  5. Draft a detailed budget of your current monthly expenses and income. For you and your children. It may be worthwhile to cater for future expenses like. Secure the monthly maintenance with a cession of an insurance policy on your ex-spouses life in case he/she is disabled or dies.
  6. Try to stay in the family house (if it’s close to your school or work). There is a saying in our law, that possession is 9 tenths of the law. Remaining in the communal home will also stabilise the situation of the children, as it is proven the relocation can be a very traumatic experience for the children.
  7. Remember that you shouldn’t necessarily have to pay transfer duties for a property transferred to you during your divorce. You may have various options relating to the property that both of you own, for example by retaining it or selling it and divide the net profits.
  8. See to it that your Divorce Settlement Agreement is drafted in such a way that that you can enforce a garnishing order on your ex-spouse’s salary should he/she default on payments, in any event, non-payment of maintenance after divorce may result in a contempt of court application.
  9. See to it that your Divorce Settlement Agreement is drafted to obtain a share of any assets that your spouse has hidden and what you are not aware of at the time of divorce in that event that you are married in community of property or out of community of property with the Accrual system.
  10. Don’t settle for less to get out, many women simply walk out due to the emotional pressure. Remember that divorce is always a business decision and the decisions that you make now will have an impact only years later in your life. Divorce is a legal process, it can be very frustrating and emotional draining that takes time and strategic planning. Don’t change attorneys in the process simply because of your own frustration, as they say, the battle of divorce is like a chess game.
  11. Remember that your ex-spouse’s assets also include shareholdings in companies, retirement funds, pension funds and even tax refunds.
  12. Think with your head and not with your heart.
  13. Remember to change your Will soon after the divorce.

For legal advice contact: info@divorceattorney.co.za

About the author:

Bertus Preller is a Divorce and Family Law Attorney in Cape Town and has more than 20 years experience in most sectors of the law and 13 years as a practicing attorney. He specializes in Family law and Divorce Law at Abrahams and Gross Attorneys Inc. in Cape Town. Bertus is also the Family Law expert on Health24.com and on the expert panel of Law24.com and is frequently quoted on Family Law issues in newspapers such as the Sunday Times and Business Times. His areas of expertise are Divorce Law, Family Law, Divorce Mediation, Parenting Plans, Parental Responsibilities and Rights, Custody (care and contact) of children, same sex marriages, unmarried fathers rights, domestic violence matters, international divorce law, digital rights, media law and criminal law.

Divorce and the impact of the recession – Sunday Times Article

While financial matters are one of the biggest strains on a marriage and a primary cause of divorce, the divorce rate has declined during the recession.

This, say some experts, is because getting divorced is costly, especially so when times are tough. Moreover, most lawyers require a deposit before they will consider a case.

People would rather hold back on divorce proceedings because of the cost involved. In many cases when there is a strain on the marriage, the main breadwinner will not disclose some sources of income or other financial details, which makes it very difficult for the other spouse to file for divorce. By default, this results in the couple staying married.

Couples have been choosing to separate or to stay together in an unhappy relationship. Most of the complaints, especially by women, are that they cannot afford to get divorced and are unsure whether they will be financially secure after divorce.

The economic climate is not that good, and people still have a lot of debt. Some people can’t afford to get divorced because of that.

Bertus Preller, an attorney at Abrahams & Gross, says couples are being coerced into staying together for pragmatic financial reasons.

Maintaining two separate households while relying on the income once used to support a single household can be very difficult when times are tough, he says.

“I also think that our challenging financial climate may have prompted individuals to reconsider the role of marriage by thinking more of it as a quest for financial stability than a quest for finding a soulmate.”

In a US survey in which 1197 married couples were asked how their relationship had changed during the recession, a third said their marriage was at a high risk of divorce through added financial stress, while 38% of couples who had been considering divorce delayed their plans because of the costs, including legal fees and setting up separate households.

About 30% said the struggle of surviving the recession had brought them closer to their partner as they weathered the storm together.

More than half of the 1600 attorneys who are members of the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers reported a 40% downturn in their business in 2009, a phenomenon the New York Daily News described as “sleeping with the enemy”.

Those same lawyers are now being inundated with new clients as financial stability returns. The Financial Times reported that, in a signal of economic recovery, the US divorce rate was growing.

A stronger economy, lower unemployment and a housing market that is stabilizing are contributing to a rise in divorce filings.

“There is a definite increase in divorce instructions this year in comparison to 2010,” says Preller.

“From this, one may assume that the economy is slowly starting to pick up and, unfortunately, the divorce rate is too.”

Article by: Adele Shevel – Sunday Times: http://www.timeslive.co.za/sundaytimes/article1064919.ece/Recession-puts-brakes-on-divorce

Bertus Preller is a Divorce and Family Law Attorney in Cape Town and has more than 20 years experience in most sectors of the law and 13 years as a practicing attorney. He specializes in Family law and Divorce Law at Abrahams and Gross Attorneys Inc. in Cape Town. Bertus is also the Family Law expert on Health24.com and on the expert panel of Law24.com and is frequently quoted on Family Law issues in newspapers such as the Sunday Times and Business Times. His areas of expertise are Divorce Law, Family Law, Divorce Mediation, Parenting Plans, Parental Responsibilities and Rights, Custody (care and contact) of children, same sex marriages, unmarried fathers rights, domestic violence matters, international divorce law, digital rights, media law and criminal law.